New micro-learning platform captures knowledge before it walks out the door

Written by Mary Isokariari on 7 October 2016 in News
News

A new micro-learning and peer-to-peer knowledge platform has been launched in the US to encourage users to share technical skills in an innovative way.

Mobile phone in hands

Speachme targets customers include major brands in the automotive and airline industries, food service, and manufacturing - many of which need to train large numbers of employees, 10,000 or more. However, any companies looking to grow their skill labour could benefit in how to drive higher retention rates. 

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Najette Fellache, CEO of speachme, believes the platform will encourage work-based learning, she said: “The Center for Creative Leadership found that 70 percent of workplace learning comes from real, on-the-job experiences. Compare that to only about 10 percent coming from formal, structured training programs. Due to that number, we believe that there is a large opportunity for speachme."

In the U.S, 64 per cent of adults now own a smartphone of some kind, according to Pew Research. 

Speachme is designed to be used from any location or device. Unlike traditional employee training programmes and learning management systems, the platform user drives content generation through an interactive, intuitive, rich media interface.

Fellache says the demand for mobile learning is growing and that organisations should take advantage of this platform.“It is extremely important when considering field services and the up-and-coming millennial workforce. This enables workers to get the right information in the right place at the right time, which means that mobile technology needs to be a part of today's learning tools.

"The future of learning is bottom-up, driven by employees for employees, and where millennials consume training not once, but small bite-sized capsules of information, constantly throughout their lifetime, making micro-learning more and more important.

“Also, the learning content should take all learning styles into consideration. Training should have a visual component, be no more than 10 minutes in length, and have a clear learning path."

 

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