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Ally Yates delves into your brain and your behaviours to reveal how you can increase creativity at work


S


teve Jobs once said: “Creativity is just connecting things.” While it’s true that when we


explore new territories we make con- nections with our existing knowledge, creativity is much more than that. It’s essential to our survival. From an evo- lutionary perspective, it is creativity that has helped us to innovate and adapt. In our everyday work, the big problems


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that confront us demand fresh thinking. At a time when neuroscience has


become the poster child of L&D and pop psychology, the science of creativity, while still in its infancy, provides some valuable fi ndings which can help to promote our ability to respond to tricky problems and novel opportunities. At its best, creativity is a whole-


brain process, drawing on various parts


of the brain to connect, explore and organise thoughts and feelings. Contrary to popular misconception, both sides of the brain are necessary for creativity. T e thicker the corpus callosum – the part of the brain that connects the two lobes – the more effi ciently the brain connects and synthesises information. T ere are also parts of the brain that can helpfully take a rest during


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