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COMMUNICATION


CUT CHASE TO THE


Paul Carroll urges us to get to the point in presentations


I


t’s easy to think of your next presentation as ‘the quarterly update to the board’ or


‘sharing the training plan with the engineering department’. Tis can trap you into preparing information to present, rather than focusing on how you can make your point and give your audience added value. Nobody’s frustrated if a presentation


is shorter than expected. However, they’ll be delighted if there is a clearly made point with additional time for a


32 | September 2017 |


Q&A when the audience can get addi- tional information and explore the ben- efits – the ‘what’s in it for me?’ element. So how can you to make the most of your airtime with key stakeholders?


Craft your message Tink about your audience’s interests and needs. If you’re giving a quarterly report, there’s likely to be something which you believe is of over-riding importance for this audience. Tus, if HR and training achieve X, the


benefit to your department will be Y. Tat’s what you want your audience to understand and agree with. Bearing this in mind, you


can then decide what to include in your presentation.


Use only key facts and statistics


When presenting to your stakeholders, there’s not time to say everything you know. Too many details risk confusing them instead of informing and persuading. Te challenge in getting


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