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TECHNOLOGY


How long will it be before robots


teach us online? Mark O’Donoghue


maintains the tutor remains key to excellence


THE HUMAN TOUCH C


ast your mind back to a training course you went on a few years ago. I bet


you’re thinking about a face-to-face session that lasted several hours sitting in a stuffy conference room with a few other people. Tis scene is disappearing fast and, instead, online courses are becoming the norm. Tis shift is being driven by


20 | AUGUST 2017 |


demand. Businesses are more global than ever, yet they still need to deliver training to all employees, at scale, no matter where they’re based. Online learning has risen to fill this gap. Yet many of the early online attempts were simply passive PowerPoint presentations or PDF documents uploaded to a server, which were no replacement for the engagement you


get with a face-to-face experience. Tis kind of experience is what gave


‘e-learning’ a bad name. I once asked an audience of HR and L&D leaders for word association with ‘e-learning’ and the first word to come back was ‘com- pliance’. E-Learning has also become a byword for ‘cost-cutting’, a way for companies to teach at scale but relying on technology to deliver a second-rate


@TrainingJournal


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