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INTERVIEW


THE ENGINES OF CHANGE E


Ed Monk talks to Debbie Carter about his views on L&D today


d Monk, the CEO of the Learning and Performance Institute (LPI), is taking


steps to ensure his members keep up to date and are ‘the engines of change’ in their organisations. How does he see the profession changing and how can institutes like the LPI support their members in times of unprecedented change?


Debbie Carter: Where do you see learning right now? Ed Monk: Learning is everywhere already! During my 20 years at the LPI I have seen the landscape change from one of training to learning, and I see us experiencing an unparalleled interest in learning for all. Tere are no constraints on how we deliver solutions – people are trying new methods, experimenting with digital, using video and we are finally developing truly blended solutions. But there is more to learning than just technology; there is now a recognition that learning in any shape or form is





The LPI is the L&D function for the learning industry and we need to curate and provide the best content learning professionals need


desirable – and providing access to that learning is crucial. L&D must harness the desire to learn and turn it into behaviour change that improves business performance. People are increasingly looking for development opportunities from employers, along with good leadership and culture, and this can only benefit L&D’s position in organisations.


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DC: Clearly these new approaches in L&D influence what you do at the LPI. How has your approach changed? EM: I feel the LPI is effectively the L&D function for the learning industry and we need to curate and provide the best content learning professionals need. We now operate in 39 different countries which brings with it a host of challenges but I like it – it’s exciting. We are innovating, intro- ducing digital badging, transforming our conference offering and developing new products. We are at the cutting edge of L&D and I’m determined we stay there. We are committed to our mantra – involve, inform and inspire. DC: Te format of your conference, LEARNINGLIVE, has changed dramatically this year. Tell us about the change and why you decided to take such a radically new approach to this event. EM: LEARNINGLIVE has always been a conference that has led the way;


last year the event was a lecture-free zone which was both innovative and incredibly effective. So we are not afraid to shake things up, if we believe it adds value. Having listened to our members, we took the decision to allow heads of learning to register for free this year. We are doing this because we are genuinely committed to improving learning for as many organisations as we can. If removing financial obstacles for these people helps then, as an institute, we should do so. Te response has been incredible. We are already at capacity, with heads of learning from organisations such as NASA, McDonald’s, Tesco and Deutsche Bank attending in September.


To find out more about the LPI and its conference, LEARNINGLIVE, visit www.learning-live.com


An extended version of this interview is available online at http://bit.ly/2uH6hrZ


| August 2017 | 9


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