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ENGAGEMENT


FAMILY FIRST


Max Robinson provides some tips on promoting a family friendly workplace


E


mployees with children really work two jobs: their paid hours in the workplace


are sandwiched between time with family in the home, maintaining the house, preparing meals and laundry, and trying to spend a little valuable time with children. Around 75% of new mothers wish


they could stop working and spend more time with their children, but are prevented from doing so because of the ever-rising cost of living.1 Recent figures suggest that it costs around £230,000 to raise a child


32 | August 2017 |


from birth to the age of 21, and that the typical household spends 38% of their income on child-related costs.2 Work, however, remains a


rewarding and positive experience for many parents, who are still keen to continue developing their career while they raise their children. Finding smart ways to support and empower working parents to achieve more, both in their home and work life, is something which all employers can do. Tis will not only result in happier employees, but also more a productive and inclusive working environment.


Lone parents


Te family dynamic is changing and, in many cases, this heightens the pressures faced by working parents. In the UK, 2.9 million families are lone-parent, making them the third most common family type.3


Lone parents often have


fewer people – if any – to help them with childcare and other commitments, which can make full-time work a real struggle to accommodate. Employers can ease this burden


by offering lone parents flexible working patterns, or remote working arrangements. Incorporating a


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