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CONTENTS CONTENTS 10 on the cover SPOTLIGHT ON ELLIOTT MASIE


American futurist, guru and Broadway


producer Elliott Masie talks to TJ about his life


and work in the �ield of learning and technology


feature 20 36 feature


HOW TO AVOID EMPLOYEE BURNOUT


If employees’ batteries run low, it can result in lost productivity, lost revenue and loss


of talent. Clayton Ainger shares his tips on how to recharge their enthusiasm


Editorial contact@trainingjournal.com 020 7593 5756


Advertising malika.elouafi @dods.co.uk 020 7593 5606


NOVEMBER 2016 LEADER


4 FROM THE EDITOR OPINION


5 DONALD H TAYLOR Don notes that, when it comes to helping people learn, some things never change


TJ AWARDS


6 THE GALA DINNER AND MORE… Debbie Carter reminds us to book our places at the TJ Awards Gala Dinner and extends another invitati on


OPINION


8 PRACTITIONER'S VIEWPOINT Think customer experience, not customer service, advises Chris Parkinson


9 COOK LOOKS Jo Cook refl ects whether courses are old fashioned


FEATURES


16 CAUTION: TRIP HAZARD The sales journey is litt ered with ‘tripping points’. Tim Routledge off ers his advice


24 DEVELOPING A SALES ACADEMY There are advantages to providing your own sales training, say W Roy Whitt en and Scott A Roy


28 EVOLUTION OF ACTION LEARNING AT MENCAP


Emily Cosgrove on how Acti on Learning is impacti ng the charity


LEADERSHIP GAP IN CUSTOMER SERVICE Sally Earnshaw


shares her favourite three tips on creating a thriving climate for customer experience


32 LISTEN AND LEARN John Heywood explores the eff ecti veness of audio acti on learning


40 ARE YOU BEING SERVED? Mary Isokariari examines training in the hospitality sector


REGULARS


42 LAST STAND Alisdair Chisholm on his fi rst job interview


www.trainingjournal.com | November 2016 | 3


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