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Dr Mike Clayton puts forward some new thinking on how L&D professionals can successfully respond to resistance


H


ave you ever heard yourself repeating some version of the cliché that change is the


only thing that is stable in today’s world? For those of us involved in training and development, change is not just part of our role; change is fundamental to the questions we’re asked and the environment we create. Every training, coaching and devel-


opment practitioner needs to understand change, and to be able to help others


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understand it and cope better with it. Change is part of our landscape and one of the forces that shapes it daily. A central aspect of dealing with


change is how we respond to resistance. But this does not just apply to us; it is one of the commonest concerns I encounter in training, seminars and one-to-one sessions. Our clients need to understand resistance to change and the need to be able to handle it in a positive manner.


CHA NGE


So how do you answer their


questions? What advice do you give and what models do you share? Most practitioners present – and work from – long-established models of change, such as Kurt Lewin’s Freeze Phases,1 Grid,2


Scott and Jaffe’s Change


John Kotter’s Eight Steps of Leading Change.4


William Bridges’ Transitions,3 Tese are all excellent


models that offer powerful insights which help us understand and deal


 | june 2016 | 17 or


RESISTANCE TO


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