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n many organisations, Monthly Highlights is a practice whereby departments,


divisions and units are mandated to present highlight reports by a deadline date to their upper level management. Every month, employees present reports of monthly achievements to their corresponding managers across the organisation’s structural hierarchy. Going bottom up, the activity begins at the unit level, where employees in various units present the highlights to their supervisors. Based on certain selection criteria, supervisors choose several items from the list and send them to their division heads. Te process is repeated at the division, department levels and finally at the corporate level where the highlights activity ends at this point with the company list of Monthly Highlights (MH). Te number of items in the MH


Table 1: List of Work Items Work/Division Type / Title P1 / Air


P2 / Land P3 / Water P4 / Air


P5 / Land P6 / Water P7 / Air


P8 / Land P9 / Water


S1 / Air S2 / Land


S3 / Water S4 / Air


S5 / Land S6 / Water S7 / Air


S8 / Land S9 / Water M


report is limited by a quota for each organisational level. Te selection criteria at each level in the organisation is based on business objectives for the unit, division, department and the company overall. Depending on the degree of importance for these business objectives, the highlights are prioritised accordingly. Te questions are: Why should the highlights only include achievements? Why is the selection criteria based only on business objectives? What if we add other factors such as employees’ performance into the selection criteria? In this article, we propose to include


employees’ performance in the MH as a way of tracking and driving towards performance improvement. In the meth- odology section, we will demonstrate the proposed method through an example of one scenario for MH that is centered on employees’ performance. Te process consists of eight steps and the cycle


BP / Install Stations for Monitoring Air Pollution BP / Categorise and Store Solid Waste for Disposal BP / Recycle Waste Water


MP / Audit Sites for Compliance with Air Pollution Regulations


MP / Audit Sites for Compliance with Solid Waste Regulations


MP / Audit Sites for Compliance with Waste Water Regulations


SP / Install Computer Code for Weather Forecast


SP / Improve Existing System for Water Waste Recycling


Employees Cycle E10, E19 4 E20, E29 4 E30, E39 4 E11


2 E21 E31 E12


SP / Implement New Method of Solid Waste Recycling E22 E32


Support / Manage Laboratory Equipment for Air Pollution


Support / Manage Equipment for Handling Solid Waste


Support / Manage Equipment for Waste Water E13, E16 E23, E26 E33, E36


Support / Maintain Database System for Air Pollution E14, E17 Support / Maintain Database System for Solid Waste


Support / Process Customer Requests for Measur- ing Air Pollution


E24, E27


Support / Maintain Database System for Waste Water E34, E37 E15, E18


Support / Process Customer Requests for Surveying Waste Sites


Support / Process Customer Requests for Sampling Water Waste


Miscellaneous E25, E28 E35, E38 Varies 2 2


1 1 1


2 2


2 2 2 2 2


2 2 1





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| july 2016 | 27


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