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MENTORING - CASE STUDY


TWENTY/TWENTY MENTORING


TWENTY/TWENTY MENTORING


Emily Cosgrove sets her sights on one company’s mentoring journey


m


entoring is a hot topic at the moment and many organisations are choosing to


invest time and resources in setting up more formal programmes for success. According to the Association for Talent Development (ATD), 71 per cent of Fortune 500 companies have a mentoring programme. And in a global CEO survey conducted by PWC, 98 per cent of millennials believe that working with a mentor is a necessary part of their career development.1 So the power of mentoring is undisputed and, when carried out with


34 | February 2017 |


care, planning and experience, it is undoubtedly a win-win. For internal organisational mentoring programmes, there is the added value of using your own people to grow and develop your key asset – your people. Some of the many reasons organisations choose to introduce


a mentoring programme include: ``


Diversity.


`` `` `` ` ` ``


Enhancing talent programmes. Knowledge transfer.


Cross-company learning. Leadership development.


As a vehicle for growing Conversational Wisdom.TM


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