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NSFORMATION TRENDS


Steve Macaulay, Sarah Cook and Richard Smith reflect on best practice in change management


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n the face of a rapidly developing and sometimes turbulent environment, more


and more organisations are recog- nising that major transformation is needed, however tough the challenge. As a result, change management has become a core organisational disci- pline, and a critical skill for leaders. Te last few years have seen a


growing maturity of understanding how to turn an organisation around and reshape it. Such transformation often needs to be achieved quickly, as at the same time many organisations are under great pressure to deliver better results; this forces the pace yet puts even more pressure on change leaders.


Tools to analyse the changing environment


Te first step in effectively managing change is gaining deep insight into


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the key change drivers affecting your business environment. Such drivers might include Brexit, disruptive technological change, or rapid shifts in markets and consumer preferences. Organisations today need to


be responsive and adaptive to the all-important customer. In an increas- ingly service-aware, cost-conscious and competitive age, understanding and responding to the changing needs of customers must take a high priority. We have written before in TJ about tools to help understand this change context.1


Analytical tools include: `` `` ``


PESTLE, to survey the political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental factors.


Force field analysis to chart the forces (positive and negative) and their impact.


SWOT, to understand the internal strengths and weaknesses, and external opportunities and threats.


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