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Fig.1: Perceived marketing skills level (%) held by L&D teams


Currently held by top performing teams Currently held by all respondents


Desired 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%


Source: Towards Maturity, Embracing Change: Improving Performance of Business, Individuals and the L&D Team (Nov 2015): www.towardsmaturity.org/2015benchmark


fundamentally disconnected from the environment they intend to impact. Tere are signs that this discon- nect is being identified by L&D departments. Some departments are reaching out for support in this area, although they are not always aware of what effective marketing is or how it should be implemented. As you can see from Fig.1, the


2015 Towards Maturity benchmarking research highlighted that a significant percentage of L&D departments see the benefit of a better understanding of marketing. Our research1


has


shown that those who are starting to pave the way still have more to learn about effective marketing practices in order to engage learners and change staff behaviours.


What is Campaign Learning?


between learning delivery and


changing behaviours devalues the L&D function. For the best designers, content and


approach of a marketing campaign. A handful of learning providers, as well as some learning departments, are rising to the challenge, though these devel- opments are in their early days and are carried out by L&D experts rather than skilled marketing specialists.


Why is marketing learning important?


Te current and historical disconnect www.trainingjournal.com


technology is not enough; we must engage learners, motivate managers and energise the organisation. Tere is a disconnect between the understanding of delivering engaging learning and a learning campaign. Tis disconnect is caused by a lack of awareness of what successful marketing is and how marketing tools can be utilised in the learner context. Present learning delivery


approaches see engagement and behaviour change as a direct result of learning design and delivery. Whether it is a course itself, an LMS or an application, these learning resources are


Campaign Learning, or a learning campaign, is the use of marketing alongside – and complementing the delivery of – learning interventions. It adds value to learning products and services through increased awareness and participation, and the embedding of behaviours. Ultimately, a learning campaign supports learning interven- tions to increase business performance. When we look at a campaign


approach to learning, we are looking to achieve a number of responses from the learner.


Pre and during course (the buy-in): 1. Creating the desire to engage Tis is the pulling force. For example, why does a buyer pick up a Coca-Cola or choose an Apple Mac?


2. Creating an understanding of the need for engagement in learning Tis creates a necessity for the


 | December 2016 | 17 70% 80% 90% 100%


Perceived marketing skills level held by L&D teams


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