How to create a company culture that boosts morale

Written by Nick Gold on 26 September 2017

For any business, big or small, the lifeblood of their company and the bedrock of their success is, of course, the people. If you take the time to encourage a motivating and welcoming company culture you will certainly create a happier workforce leading to increased employee retention, productivity and a confident team spirit, ultimately benefitting the whole company.

The following points delve into what I have learnt about delivering a constructive company culture.

Acknowledge and reward

If a manager can deliver rewards which surpass expectations, this will result in a warm glow and sustained goodwill from the employee to the employer. A reward can be anything from words of thanks, to public acknowledgement and acts of service, such as gifts and spontaneous gestures like allowing the team to go home early.

The performance of the company, meaning both the success and the failures of projects should be shared, so that employees understand the reasoning behind managerial decisions and the positioning of the wider company picture.

Due to the nature of our industry often you have to work outside the 9-5 hours, and if there is an evening showcase or networking event, I am very conscious our team will have gone above and beyond to commit themselves to this.

So, I always try to say thank you in a way which both surprises and delights – as a company full of foodies, you can imagine which shape this usually takes. So, whether it is a spontaneous late night pizza or a big breakfast the following day, I make sure we carry out these little gestures to bring smiles to the faces of the team.

They are the company, they don’t work for the company

The performance of the company, meaning both the success and the failures of projects should be shared, so that employees understand the reasoning behind managerial decisions and the positioning of the wider company picture. This transparency creates a layer of trust between the employee and employer, which empowers all parties.

We hold an annual away weekend, in which we discuss our strategy for the upcoming months. One of the sessions within this event involves us outlining the performance of the company.


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This essential section of the weekend involves us requesting the team to ask questions about the minutiae of the company performance and targets, so there is a collective understanding of both our market position and the decisions being made about direction of the company.

This consultative approach both ensures there is a collective understanding and that everyone feels a sense of ownership in the company as a whole.

Provide the right environment

An open plan office means there is constantly a general friendly buzz, but we also have a meeting room which the team are continuously reminded is theirs to use for private conversations with management. These conversations are my absolute priority, we stress and ensure that the diary shifts around the team and their needs.

I make sure in these conversations that I strike a friendly tone and that I contextualise the discussion around the individual’s broader wellbeing and life outside of the office. This is made easier by being part of the office chatter, but it also means that I can foster a friendly personal connection to my team, not just a professional one.

Fundamentally, no employee of any organisation wants to feel like they are being left out to dry, or being asked to do something where they are taking ultimate responsibility. A manager should never use their job title as a right but, they should see that by demonstrating a strong work ethic and fostering a positive environment, then their team will feel supported and certainly reflect this in their work.

 

About the author

Nick Gold is managing director of market-leading speaker bureau and consultancy, Speakers Corner

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